FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT RECALL OF SELECT CHICKEN PRODUCTS PRODUCED IN MARCH

JULY 3, 2014

Which products are involved?
Products recalled:

  • Fresh chicken products sold by retailers under Foster Farms or private label brand names, with varying “use or freeze by” date ranges of March 16, 2014 to March 31, 2014, and a Plant code of P-6137, P-6137A or P-7632
  • Sunland Frozen Chicken products with “best by” dates from March 7, 2015 to March 11, 2015
  • Fresh Foster Farms branded chicken products in grocery stores today are not involved. Individually frozen bags of chicken sold at retail are not involved. For a complete list of products, please visit www.FosterFarms.com/March2014ProductRecall.

    What should I do if I have this recalled product?
    Consumers should discard product immediately. Foster Farms promises a 100 percent quality guarantee – we always have. If you purchased recalled product, please contact us for a refund at 800-338-8051, info@fosterfarms.com or by mail:

    Foster Farms
    P.O. Box 306
    Livingston, CA 95334

    I’m not comfortable with other Foster Farms products currently in my refrigerator or freezer, can I return them?
    Only products made in California within this specific March timeframe and with plant codes of P-6137, P-6137A and P-7632 are involved. Fresh Foster Farms branded chicken products in grocery stores today are not involved. Individually frozen bags of chicken sold at retail are not involved. The USDA continues to approve all Foster Farms products as safe for consumption when properly handled and cooked to 165 degrees Fahrenheit. We have worked hard to earn your trust for 75 years. Each day we continue to work to retain that trust. If for any reason you are not satisfied with our products, we stand by our 100 percent quality guarantee.

    I think I/my family member became ill from your products, what should I do?
    Foster Farms regrets any instance in which illness may be associated with our products. Please contact us at 800-338-8051, info@fosterfarms.com or by mail:

    Foster Farms
    P.O. Box 306
    Livingston, CA 95334

    Why is Foster Farms issuing a recall?
    Our first concern is always the health and safety of the people who enjoy our products, and we stand committed to doing our part to enhance the safety of our nation’s food supply. This recall is prompted by a single illness associated with specific fresh chicken product, but in the fullest interest of food safety, Foster Farms has broadened the recall to encompass all products packaged at that time. Foster Farms regrets any illness associated with its products.

    Foster Farms’ progress in significantly reducing Salmonella in chicken parts is based on a multi-hurdle approach and thorough collaboration with the government and the poultry industry. Rolling 3-month data sets provided to and verified by the USDA demonstrate that Foster Farms has achieved the goal it set in October to reduce Salmonella in raw poultry parts to less than five percent, well below the 2011-2012 USDA-measured industry benchmark of 25 percent.

    What is the company doing to address these issues?
    In October 2013, the U.S. industry average for Salmonella in poultry parts was 25 percent. At that time, Foster Farms began implementing a multi-hurdle program designed to reduce Salmonella at each stage of the production process – from ranches where the birds are raised, to the plants where they are processed. By March 2014, when these products were produced, Foster Farms Salmonella prevalence levels companywide were less than 10 percent. Additional improvements since March have reduced Salmonella levels to less than 5 percent.

    Foster Farms’ progress in significantly reducing Salmonella in chicken parts is based on a multi-hurdle approach and thorough collaboration with the government and the poultry industry. Rolling 3-month data sets provided to and verified by the USDA demonstrate that Foster Farms has achieved the goal it set in October to reduce Salmonella in raw poultry parts to less than five percent, well below the 2011-2012 USDA-measured industry benchmark of 25 percent.

    Food safety remains our top priority. We will continue to work with the USDA, the industry and leading food safety and poultry experts to ensure our products are safe when properly handled and fully cooked.

    Why is there Salmonella on your products?
    Salmonella occurs naturally in poultry, and Foster Farms continues to minimize the risk for consumers. Experts agree that even with very low levels of incidence, the poultry industry cannot completely eliminate the prevalence of Salmonella. All raw chicken must be properly handled to avoid cross contamination and fully cooked to 165 degrees Fahrenheit to ensure safety.

    The company now leads the industry in reducing incidence levels of Salmonella. Rolling 3-month data sets provided to and verified by the USDA demonstrate that Foster Farms has achieved the goal it set in October to reduce Salmonella to less than five percent, well below the USDA-measured industry average of 25 percent.



    Consumer Affairs