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NEW SURVEY REVEALS SHOPPERS FEEL DECEIVED BY "NATURAL" LABELING OF SALTWATER-INJECTED POULTRY
Foster Farms maintains commitment to 100% Natural and launches new consumer awareness campaign

5/11/2009
LIVINGSTON, Calif. - Amidst an increasing national focus on sodium as a critical health issue, West Coast poultry producer Foster Farms today launches a comprehensive consumer campaign to raise awareness of saltwater-injected or "plumped" chicken. "Plumping" - or the injecting - of fresh, raw chicken with saltwater is a practice employed by many chicken companies which costs consumers money and contributes to serious health issues. Under current USDA labeling laws, brands that plump their poultry may still label their chicken as "100% Natural" or "All-Natural." According to a new survey released today, consumers are largely unaware of plumping and would prefer that only non-injected chicken be labeled as "All-Natural."

"Our survey found that most consumers have no idea that the fresh, raw chicken they purchase intending to season or marinate themselves can contain such high levels of salt," said Ira Brill, Director of Marketing for Foster Farms. "At a time when consumers are paying attention to their health and their budget, this deserves attention. Many poultry brands contend that injected poultry yields juicier, more flavorful meat, but our survey demonstrates consumers want to know what they’re paying for. Foster Farms’ 100% Natural, fresh chicken line is never plumped."

Today, Foster Farms publicly releases the results of a new survey conducted in March indicating that the majority of consumers (63.1%) are largely unaware of the hidden salt in many poultry brands and felt deceived after learning about it. Among the survey findings1:

o Despite the fact that 71.3% of consumers try to watch their sodium intake at least some of the time, many consumers are still unaware of some of the "fine print" in product labels, even for USDA-labeled "100% Natural," minimally-processed foods like chicken.

o 85.9% of consumers surveyed did not realize that a serving of some brands’ fresh, raw chicken could contain more salt per serving than a large order of french fries. (Some brands of plumped chicken can contain 440 mg of sodium, versus 350 mg of sodium in a large order of french fries from a national fast food chain.)

o 74.5% of consumers believe fresh chicken labeled as "natural" should contain no additives or preservatives; 82.4% believe that fresh chicken carrying the "natural" label should not be injected with saltwater.

o Upon learning that the saltwater in injected chicken could cost them nearly $1.50 per package2, 69.2% of consumers felt deceived and 37.2% felt angry.

o After learning about "plumping," 70.7% will change the way they shop for fresh chicken: 85.4% will read nutrition labels and avoid saltwater-injected chicken, while 71.7% percent vowed to warn a friend.


Research has shown that high sodium intake is linked to many diseases, including high blood pressure and heart disease3. A close examination of some raw poultry nutrition labels reveals that a four-ounce serving of plumped chicken could contain as much as 440 mg of sodium, more than 700% more than truly natural chicken4. Based on the Center for Disease Control’s new dietary guidelines of 1500 mg per day or less5 of sodium, eating just one single serving of some brands’ poultry could add up to nearly a third of their recommended daily intake. From an economic standpoint, it also means that a family of four could spend more than $150 annually on saltwater alone6.

"Today’s families are looking for ways to get higher value and quality in the products they buy," said Brill. "In our 70-year history, Foster Farms has never injected our fresh, raw chicken labeled "100% Natural" with saltwater or any other additives and we will maintain this commitment to consumers. We’ve launched a multifaceted communications campaign to inform consumers about this common practice and provide them with new information to help them make better choices for their families. As a family-owned company, Foster Farms remains committed to providing consumers with products that meet their value and quality needs."

Foster Farms’ "Say No To PlumpingTM" public information campaign includes online and traditional media elements including television advertising featuring the Foster Imposters (available online at www.fosterfarms.com). Unique to this campaign will be the company’s participation in several high-profile events during the summer, where the brand will utilize street teams to spread the word about plumping with entertaining, compelling visuals. Foster Farms today launches a new online resource (www.saynotoplumping.com) where consumers can learn more about plumping and take action. The Foster Farms web site, www.fosterfarms.com, features low-sodium recipes, as well as shopping and eating tips from the company’s nutritionist.

About Foster Farms
Since 1939, West Coast families have depended on Foster Farms for premium quality chicken and turkey products. Family-owned and operated, the company continues its legacy of excellence and commitment to quality established by its founders, Max and Verda Foster. Foster Farms specializes in fresh, all natural chicken and turkey products free of preservatives, additives or injected sodium enhancers. Based in California’s Central Valley, with ranches also in the Pacific Northwest, the company’s fresh chicken and turkey are produced in or near each region served. Foster Farms also produces delicious pre-marinated, ready-to-cook and fully cooked products that meet the quality and convenience needs of today’s home cooks, retailers, warehouse clubs and foodservice customers. The company’s commitment to excellence, honesty, quality, service, and people is a source of great pride, and, a longtime family tradition.

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1Survey conducted by NSON Opinion Research (March 25, 2009 – April 2, 2009)
2Average price for boneless, skinless chicken breast is $3.33/lb (USDA) and up to 15% saltwater content by weight (Truthful Labeling Coalition); assuming average weight of a package of boneless, skinless chicken breasts is 3 lbs.
3UCSF "Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults" study, March 2009.
4Foster Farms all-natural chicken breasts contain 67 mg of sodium per serving.
5Application of Lower Sodium Intake Recommendations to Adults --- United States, 1999--2006." Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 27 March 2009.
6Average chicken consumption of 86 lbs/capita per year (USDA), average price for chicken breast at $3.33/lb (USDA) and up to 15% saltwater content by weight (Truthful Labeling Coalition).